‘Mortal Kombat’: No flawless victory in filmmaking

Mortal Kombat hits hard with its epic fight scenes but loses steam with its plot. Developing a film based on a video game from the ’90s can be tricky, especially if it’s beloved and remembered by many who harken to the heyday of 2D video games. Despite its critics, Mortal Kombat championed as number one in this weekend’s box office, pulling in $23.5 million from the film’s debut in theaters as well as streaming on HBO Max.

Herstory: Pasadena tells women “we want you” in politics

In the past decade more women than ever have ascended to positions of political leadership. In 2018, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez won the Democratic primary for New York’s 14th Congressional District, becoming the youngest woman in history elected to Congress. In 2020, Kamala Harris became the first woman and the first woman of color to be elected Vice-President of the United States. The barriers that women have faced to rise and maintain political power demonstrates the resilience that they have.

More than a handshake: PCC struggles to get athletes to commit

Recruiting is all about building relationships. It usually starts off with a simple handshake. College coaches who build the best relationships, will recruit the best players, which usually leads to them having the best programs in the country. Then there’s the fun part. Prospective recruits get to experience tons of campus tours and special passes for games.

Rounding third base: PCC sports finally return for conditioning

Empty stands and playing fields filled PCC when the pandemic put a halt to all sports more than a year ago. Now, PCC is welcoming back its student-athletes for conditioning, and teams are finally seeing each other in person, some for the very first time. “Some of these kids, this is the first time I’ve ever worked out with them, and they’ve been in my program since coming into 2020,” said head coach Monica Tantlinger. “To meet them, see them and get to work with …

Guantanamo Bay: The beacon of American hypocrisy must close

On April 16, 2021, 24 senators signed a letter to President Biden asking for the closure of Guantanamo Bay, calling it a “symbol of lawlessness.” In a country that was founded on liberty and justice for all, the United States government needs to practice what they preach and close this despicable prison camp. Guantanamo Bay was established in 2002 in response to the terror attacks on September 11. It is a detention center stationed in Cuba meant to hold terrorists and dangerous prisoners, the majority …

False alarm, suspicious individuals and sleepy transients

PCC Police blotter for April 12, 2021 – April 18, 2021 Monday, April 12 Two transients were discovered sleeping on campus, one near C building and one near the child development center. Both transients were escorted off campus. Tuesday, April 13 Nothing to report. Wednesday, April 14 Nothing to report. Thursday, April 15 A PCC administrator witnessed questionable behavior from a facilities staff person employed by the El Monte Union School District. Email was received from a staff member from the Rosemead campus regarding questionable …

A biased telling of history keeps white supremacy alive

With the Derek Chauvin verdict, holding a police officer accountable for the death of George Floyd, it is sickening to behold any opposition to the suffering that the African American community endures. A counter movement claimed much smaller crowds hailing that white lives matter and attempted to promote the idea of opposition “against the media, government and educational institutions that are anti-white.” The entitlement with these views is undeniable and is rooted in our flawed educational system, which continues to perpetuate white supremacy. The history …