Aaron Tan / Courier Back in October, Disney unveiled its "Stuntronics" flying stunt robot, geared to perform impressive acrobatic feats. Today, a debate rages over workers and whether too may become obsolete as society becomes more and more automated.
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Disney is a company that was built on imagination, and that dreams really can come true. One of their latest dreams is to designing a robot that can perform acrobatic stunts. The robot introduced by Disney researchers back in October 2018 is known as Stuntronics.

The idea has sparked a debate whether or not it would be taking the jobs of many employees.

According to the Daily Mail, these robots could possibly even take the jobs of actors in films.

“The idea is to recreate the incredible scenes regularly depicted in films, without endangering a stunt actor’s life,” reported the Daily Mail.

Let’s be realistic here. The Walt Disney Company has a network worth of $98 billion dollars – of course they will do anything in their power to save money, and prevent lawsuits from stunt doubles who are injured. This fear of “robots taking over the world” is unrealistic, but the fear of them taking million of jobs away from people is a legitimate concern.

According to the company’s website the company’s mission statement is to : “… create a realistic robotic figure capable of performing complex, acrobatic stunts. Imagineers designed a 90-pound Stuntronics figure to use sophisticated onboard sensors to make its own real-time decisions—all while flying 60 feet in the air.”

This is a clear example of the company feeding the public complete bullshit of what the Stuntronics will be doing. They will not tell you the negative impacts it will have employment because they want people to think this idea is just another advancement in technology.  

The New York Post, states: “The focus—for now—isn’t on replacing stuntmen and stuntwomen in actual movies, but rather to use robotic versions in the theme parks that Disney uses to monetize its franchises even further.”

How do we know this for sure?

According to Techcrunch, in a interview with Tony Dohi, Principal R&D Imagineer discussed his hopes to have animation characters just screen in their movies during stunts in the park.

“… the expectation our park guests have that our characters are doing all these things on screen — but when it comes to our attractions, what are our animatronic figures doing? We realized we have kind of a disconnect here,” said Dohi.

What if this all turns out to be a business scam that Disney will cover up until jobs are gone?

Until further work is done to this project, there is no final conclusion that can be drawn on the future of employment for stuntmen and stuntwomen. Until then, Disney’s researchers will keep covering up the true intent behind these robots to make it look like it’s the latest advancement. This corporation only wants to save themselves from any lawsuits and to save themselves money. They don’t care about the many people who will lose their jobs.

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