Observers of the Thursday protest against class cuts on campus had mixed feelings about how the demonstrators were raising the issues.


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Observers of the Thursday protest against class cuts on campus had mixed feelings about how the demonstrators were raising the issues.

“I sympathize with them, it’s a serious issue,” said Austin Yoon, undeclared, who was sitting by the Mirror Pools as the protesters marched by. “But is this accomplishing anything now? Maybe they should go to whom they should be yelling at, otherwise they’re just yelling at each other.”

Echoing his statement was Cassandra Herrera, who is currently in the EOPS program.

“There are different ways to [approach] the problem,” she said. “They were attacking people who didn’t stand with them. While what’s happening is sad, I wouldn’t stand with them if they were doing that to me.”

However, mathematics major Sarah Belknap and social work major Bijan Bahmani  believed that the protests have had such an impact that the “Spring Forward” intersession was created.

“The protests [resulted in] reinstatement of the winter intersession for a third year now,” said Bahmani. “The protests do make a difference.”

Students participating in Club Rush week also questioned the protesters’ methods.

“It’s good to be raising awareness of the issues, but that’s all they’re really doing,” said Carlos Reyes, geology. “They’re not putting anything in motion.”

“They should stay in class,” said Belem Sanchez, also geology. “There’s a better chance of them changing from within the system.”

Others, however, felt that the protests were needed.

“I agree with what they’re doing,” said Michael Romero, biology. “It’s the only way to get their attention. It does work if we take a stand … more people should get involved.”

Stefania Garcia, a history and psychology major, stood by the protesters, saying it was unfair for the administration to delay their future.

“I’m in the pathway program right now,” Garcia said. “I’m uncertain that I’ll be able to get my classes [next semester].”

Culinary major Sarah Demclaren and holistic medicine major Emani Matthews both expressed sympathy for those having trouble getting their classes.

“I feel bad for all the new people,” said Demclaren. “I have seniority so I can pretty much get any class I want.”

“I hope the protesters win,” said Matthews. “To be honest, why cut from education first? It’s a really dumb move to cut from a generation that might actually help.”

 

Additional reporting by Neil Protacio, Mary Nurrenbern, Edwin Lee, and Christine Michaels.

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