With social media becoming our generation’s most common form of communication, people are able to share whatever they wish about themselves to all of their friends, family, and even strangers with a click of a button.
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With social media becoming our generation’s most common form of communication, people are able to share whatever they wish about themselves to all of their friends, family, and even strangers with a click of a button.

But the convenience and security of hiding behind a keyboard or a smart phone makes it so simple to exaggerate how awesome one’s life really is. Which begs the question: are you ‘about that life’ or are you just another poseur on the Internet?

“You see people on the Internet who always seem to be out partying, or having a good time, but when you actually hang out with them, it’s funny because they’re not what you expect them to be,” said student Mackenzie Pelgado. “You see these people and laugh because they’re trying so hard to make themselves something they’re not.”

People will over-extend themselves on social networks to become noticed, or to become “instafamous”, which is defined on UrbanDictionary.com as a person who’s famous on the popular app Instagram because they have thousands of followers and get hundreds of likes.

“Nobody needs to know your personal life. You put those things out there to be exposed,” said Lawrence Philips, Biology major. “I know so many people who post a lot of money on Instagram, but don’t even pay their bills…Where are your priorities?”

The current generation thrives on the publicity they get via social networking. The more likes they get, the better they feel about themselves. Like Philips said, where are your priorities?

“The biggest poseurs of all time are people who say they have a life because they’re mingling online with people but what they really need to do is go get a life,” said Micah Howlett, music.

Students across campus agreed that if you spend more time in front of the mirror taking flexing selfies than you do at the gym, you are not “about that life.” Or if you spend more time tweeting about how much fun you’re having as opposed to actually having fun, then you are not about that life.

It’s simple: don’t get so caught up in the hype of online networking that you forget to network in real life.

 

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