John Novak / Courier Jose Remes, business management, cruises through the halls of the CC Building as he heads back to class on Tuesday, Feb. 26. "I had a dream…that Stacy Peralta told me to wear short shorts and to ride the halls of PCC," Jose said.
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John Novak / Courier Jose Remes, business management, cruises through the halls of the CC Building as he heads back to class on Tuesday, Feb. 26. "I had a dream…that Stacy Peralta told me to wear short shorts and to ride the halls of PCC," Jose said.
John Novak / Courier
Jose Remes, business management, cruises through the halls of the CC Building as he heads back to class on Tuesday, Feb. 26. “I had a dream…that Stacy Peralta told me to wear short shorts and to ride the halls of PCC,” Jose said.

Driving is not for everyone, so some students have turned to skateboards and bicycles to get them to class.

One reason why students prefer these ways of reaching their destinations instead of driving is because of the cost. Driving requires paying for gas, insurance, parking permits and the general upkeep of the vehicle. Cycling and skateboarding on the other hand, don’t need as much financially to be effective.

“In [Southern California] if you are under 25, insurance is sky high, so it’s unwise for college students [to drive],” said Charles Loop, business major. Loop is a cyclist who bikes approximately 30 miles a day.

Michael Maiden, liberal arts, decided to skateboard because it’s cheaper and easier to maneuver. He isn’t much of a skater; he just uses it to get to PCC. He bikes to his job and drives for long travel.

“I don’t want to put that much money into a car,” said Maiden. “I chose this means of transportation because it’s small and I can carry it everywhere.”

Long boarders James Juarez, art major, and August Licano, art and music major, would rather skate than drive. They skate from Whittier to PCC for their classes.

“[I have] no gas money so it helps a lot,” said Juarez about skating.

“There’s a lot to miss out on when you’re driving in a car,” said Licano. “With skating, you take things slower.”

Some students like the health benefits these forms of transportation offer. The physical effort required makes these not only efficient ways of getting around, but they double as a chance for some exercise. Also, many find it a good way to meet people with like interests.

“[Skating] keeps your reflexes quick,” said Juarez.

“It keeps you in shape, looks cool, and [helps you make] friends,” said Licano.

“I’ve met more people because of my bike in a positive fashion than any other time in my life,” said Loop.

One obstacle skaters and cyclists encounter is the need to transport things such as textbooks and school projects. For Loop, this is not an issue.

“I plan ahead for transporting stuff,” he said. Cyclists use bike racks, saddlebags and baskets when they need to bring stuff with them.

Licano and Juarez said it’s not as easy for skaters. “It’s hard to keep up speed,” says Juarez. Licano added that it was “annoying.”

Another issue is dealing with harsh weather, but Loop also has a solution for that.

“I wear a full rain suit, rubber pants and [rain] boots,” he said. “Rain or shine, it’s time to ride.”

Maiden doesn’t like skating when it rains. “You have to deal with back splash.”

A common problem for both skaters and cyclists is dealing with pedestrians and drivers. Whether it’s drivers not checking before they turn or texting while they drive, skaters and cyclists must be alert.

“Cars don’t ever look right so we almost get hit every day,” said Licano.

“The main difference between [biking] and driving is that you can’t be on your phone,” said Loop. “When you are riding, you are limited to riding.”

“You have to dress like a slot machine in Vegas for people to see you,” Loop said. He says bikers are supposed to wear bright colors and reflective clothes to be safe, which he does.

Antonio Gandara / Courier Jose Remes is one of the many students that have turned to skateboards to get them to class.
Antonio Gandara / Courier
Jose Remes is one of the many students that have turned to skateboards to get them to class.

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