Not everyone works on the same schedule. Some students prefer to further their education after the sun goes down, while some have to deal with other demands during the day.


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Not everyone works on the same schedule. Some students prefer to further their education after the sun goes down, while some have to deal with other demands during the day.

“There are a lot of older people in the evening,” said Ezequiel Torres, 19, psychology.

Torres likes taking evening classes because the campus is not as hectic as earlier in the day.

“The campus is less busy because a lot of people are on their way home,” he said.

Some students prefer to attend evening classes because it gives them time to do other things during the day.

“I like taking evening courses because I work in the mornings,” said Brenda Gonzales, a 21-year-old studying child development.

Safety doesn’t seem to be an issue when students decide whether or not to take an evening class.

“The parking is great,” said Taylor Alderson, 40, architecture.

“I always feel safe here at night. The campus is well lit, there are always people around and I don’t loiter too long,” she said.  

Katherine Hildebrandt is another student who uses the daytime hours to complete various tasks.

“I find it easier to get things done in the morning. It’s nice to come to school after you’ve done what you need to do, and not feel so overwhelmed during class time,” said the 23-year-old theater arts student.

For many students, night classes are beneficial, so that they can use the daytime hours for finishing leftover schoolwork.

“I can do my homework in the morning, as well as handle various chores,” said Criselena Diaz, 18, English.

Not all students are as comfortable with having to take classes later in the day.

“I find it more difficult because my night classes are usually longer,” said Thomas Finney, 20, psychology.

“I have morning classes also, and it’s hard get out late at night and then have to get up early in the morning to start again,” he said.

Instructors can also see a difference between day and night on campus.

“I see older students at night and a lot of them are working full time,” said Michael Gougis, adjunct journalism professor.

“Sometimes you can tell that working a full day has sapped the energy from them and it could be hard for them to do well. On the other hand for a lot of them, the job that’s grinding them down motivates them to do well in the class.”

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