(Nagisa Mihara/Courier) Professor Clarita Corona teaches the World Dance: Spain/Protugal class the Fandango, a couples dance from Spain on February 3rd at the W building.
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Dance is a form of expression that could be traced back to the dawn of time. Being a common factor in most cultures, PCC offers multiple dance courses, including World Ethnic Dance class, which focuses on different cultures that vary from Africa to the British Isles/Europe.

(Nagisa Mihara/Courier) Professor Clarita Corona teaches the World Dance: Spain/Protugal class the Fandango, a couples dance from Spain on February 3rd at the W building.
(Nagisa Mihara/Courier) Professor Clarita Corona teaches the World Dance: Spain/Protugal class the Fandango, a couples dance from Spain on February 3rd at the W building.

Clara Corona, a World Ethnic Dance professor here on campus, describes the course as an adventure and a great experience. Her class focuses on Spanish and Portuguese ethnic dance, particularly Flamenco.

Everybody takes away something personal,” Corona said. “Flamenco is about the individual. It’s about your personal experience and your personal expression. Some people leave with a sense of confidence they never had, and with the sense of security that they can challenge themselves and meet those challenges.” 

The class covers the different roles, beats, rhythms, and dance within Flamenco, how it’s put together and its representation of the roots of Spain and Portugal. The students within the course then proceed to actually put themselves in the process of forming this multi-elemental dance.

Jeff Miles, a student of this course, describes Flamenco as fierce and powerful.

“It’s very rhythmical, every sound you make has to be in unison with the music. You’re a percussionist with your feet,” Miles said. “You get to let out all your passion that you built up throughout the day. Instead of getting angry, you can pound it out on the floor and be fierce and have a good time.”

Helen Martinez, another student of this course describes it as a lot of fun. “I’ve learned how to isolate my body,” Martinez said. “I’m not afraid to throw myself out there and look awkward anymore.”

People do not take this class just for the fact that it covers the diversity requirement for your AA/AS degree, but people take this class because it gives them a worldly experience right here in Pasadena.

“It’s a really different experience,” Corona said. “There’s a humanity in this class. This thing that people can relate too. Every dance form has something very unique to it, and Flamenco really puts you in a different spot.”

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