Rocking out for more than 130 years, the everlasting and historically appreciated vinyl record stands firm in the audio recording media industry.
SHARE: FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

Rocking out for more than 130 years, the everlasting and historically appreciated vinyl record stands firm in the audio recording media industry.

record-store_skelly_01182014-(15)Although the turn of the century brought the desolation of record sales, the LP-driven design continues to prosper.

Students at PCC, vinyl collectors, artists, club disc jockeys and other media indulging circles have been just some of the contributors who enable the sales of vinyl records to continue.

Record buyer for PooBah’s Record Shop in Pasadena Ras G said buyers need to clearly understand the fine line between good music on vinyl and the commonly misconstrued hipster mentality. Being an artist himself, Ras G, who works as a hip-hop producer, only records and sells his music on vinyl and cassettes. The physical connection with the public is what artists want to go for, he said. One-on-one interaction with the listener from the artist is built when purchasing a vinyl record.

“Vinyl is for that patient person,” Ras G said.

Large media mediums and social networking sites like Twitter, Facebook, and iTunes are the go-to places for new music.

“The importance of love through music is embedded with vinyl as opposed to music you just like through mp3 downloads,” he said. “A hipster is a whack follower of things that are not mainstream. Let’s focus our attention on the real and not the followers.”

Pasadena’s Canterbury Records, owned by Charles Gordon, is just one of the two record shops still around in the City of Roses.  Gordon discussed his outlook on his interpretation of the artist and vinyl integration.

According to Gordon, the record business is as booming as ever. Records have never went away. There are business initiatives that labels are throwing out to keep the vinyl buying community thriving. These interesting ways to sell their product include offering  packages like greatest hits compilations and deluxe editions with bonus materials.

“Records are always selling and lately its becoming a trendy thing among young people,” Charles said. “Some barely know what a record is yet appreciate vinyl, which is great. ”

Stephen F Jones, an adjunct professor in the music department, said the need for vinyl relates to sound quality.

“The quality is better, warmer, and sounds better. Whereas the digital audio format used on cds and mp3s just are not as warm,” Jones said.

PCC students Jourdan Tyner, Catalina Akbar, and Patrick Jordan, who are all involved in media production, agree that vinyl records are still in full swing. Thanks to society’s need for entertainment, raves, and vintage -retro chic styles, the vinyl records fad continues to push forward.

Comments

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.