The city was abuzz with thousands of people bustling between Pasadena’s many museums and art galleries during the bi-annual ArtNight on Friday where students and various other patrons of the arts enjoyed a free evening of art.
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The city was abuzz with thousands of people bustling between Pasadena’s many museums and art galleries during the bi-annual ArtNight on Friday where students and various other patrons of the arts enjoyed a free evening of art.

Eighteen of Pasadena’s prominent arts and culture institutions opened their doors to the public and free shuttle busses were provided to allow people easy transportation between each one.

“Pasadena is a city that’s well known for its involvement in the arts. I come to this every year and I am always amazed by it,” said Kevin Donofrio, graphic design. “It’s a city wide event that incorporates every form of art you can think of. How can you not be impressed? And there’s free beer [at the Armory], which makes it a bajillion times better.”

Coinciding with ArtNight, PCC held a reception for the artists of its exhibition, “In Two Places at Once.”

The exhibition is spread between two galleries—the Gallery on the Quad and the Boone Family Art Gallery, in the newly constructed Center For the Arts—and features work from 47 artists and designers who are also faculty members at the college.

The title of the exhibition refers not only to it being displayed in two different galleries, but also to the artists being instructors as well as continuing to practice their crafts and produce art, according to Brian Tucker, gallery director.

”We thought it would be great to draw people from the busses on Colorado Boulevard, along a bent axis from the [Gallery on the Quad] and have them continue to the Center for the Arts,” said Joseph Futtner, interim dean of the visual arts and media studies division.

“What was once kind of an ugly walk is now considerably enhanced by the new destination,” he added.

According to Charles Jones, gallery manager, about 700 people showed up to the exhibition.

“It’s wonderful that the kids get to see what their instructors are producing. Sometimes when you’re creative it’s hard to take criticism from people when you don’t know what they’re all about,” said Miriam Peralta, a former PCC student who attended ArtNight with her family.

Peralta said that her favorite piece in the exhibition was Eamon Conklin’s untitled digital c-print, which shows a closed window looking out at a dry deserted landscape.

“It reminds me of being trapped in a little room in the middle of nowhere and all you have to see is a corner of this barren, depressing scene with rocky hills in the back. I want to break out and escape beyond those hills,” Peralta said.

“In a broader sense it makes me want to get out of my surroundings and see everything beyond what’s here. I want to see everything outside my metaphorical window and not just limit my view.”

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